2020 Semester 2

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11 replies
  1. Colin Barker
    Colin Barker says:

    I have never tried bush tucker, I have heard about it, but never tried any of it. The most famous I think is the witchedy grub, not sure how to spell it, not sure what the taste is like but I think that you need to roast it on the fire. I guess there are others too from the local plants and animals, I tried kangaroo meat once but I didn’t like it too much,

    • Andrea-P
      Andrea-P says:

      I love all the foods from the land. I tried witchetty grubs years ago and was no fan. They were roasted in the fire on a shovel.
      However, I love the food around Arnhem Land and Kakadu. The fish is incredible, espeically cooked in the sand oven. Also I love the apples that was in the content earlier. I think it’s called manboyberre. There are three types and I like the white one. I could eat them all day. And also there are sour plums and some purple berries that I really like.

      • Zenobia-J
        Zenobia-J says:

        I have tried witchetty grub years ago and I can’t say that I was a big fan! As child in South Africa we had to eat mopanie worms, which is similar to withcetty grub and I still remember the day they made us eat it at school! Last year I was fortunate to spent time in Arnhem Land and we enjoyed both bush pig and kangaroo, both cooked in ground ovens – it was delicious. We also tried some yubbie-like thing, but I can’t remember the name now and that was amazing. I am told that manimunak (magpie goose) is wonderful and I look forward to trying that soon.
        I was really fascinated by how much the kids enjoyed learning about the plants and manme. On one day, they kids also showed us how to find turtle and then they had it for dinner. The plums and apples are abundant and the delight on the children’s faces when they see it and can eat it, is enough to bring a smile to your face without even knowing how good it may taste!

  2. Andrea-P
    Andrea-P says:

    I found this week’s content difficult because some of the relationships are different to what I am used to. My bininj family uses the same term for many different relationships and I am still often confused about who is in an avoidance relationship because some connections are not that obvious. One example is that I Korlonj is used for nieces and nephews but I am also called korlonj by one ngarrpa but the others say djedje. Like in the content, Mamamh is used more. I was wondering why there were not many people to call Mawah!

    The most confusing part is that I call someone Kakkali but I thought they were Kakkak and it’s to do with marriages. I am still working that out and hope to ask Jill in the online session.

  3. Zenobia-J
    Zenobia-J says:

    I need some help with this week’s revision exercises. Can anybody please check my sentences below and see where I am right or wrong? I feel confident sometimes, but then other times I am VERY unsure!
    1. Where do you live right now? Baleh yihyo?
    2. Where does he/she live right now? Baleh kahyo?
    3. Where do they live right now? Baleh kabirrihyo?

    4. What are they doing? Njale kabirriyime?
    5. Do you see a crocodile? Yikarrme yinan kinga?
    6. Where are we going? Karrire yiddok?

    How would you answer these questions?
    1. Baleh yihyo? Ngahni kore Wollongong.
    2. Baleh kahyo? Ngaleng kahyo kore Darwin.
    3. Baleh kabirrihyo? Bedda kabirrihyo kore Melbourne.
    4. Njale kabirriyime? Bedda kabirrire kulabbarl.
    5. Yikarrme yinan kinga? Larrk, minj nganan kinga.
    6. Karrire yiddok? Kabirrire kunred.

    • Zenobia-J
      Zenobia-J says:

      OK, I would like to correct myself with a few things!

      5. Do you see a crocodile? Yiddok yinan kinga?

      how would you answer these questions?
      2. Baleh kahyo? Ngaleng kahni kore Darwin.
      3. Baleh kabirrihyo? Bedda kabirrihni kore Melbourne.
      6. Karrire yiddok? Karrire kunred.

      I would like to know more about the yime- verb. Can I use it as above where I asked “What are you doing?” and also “how do you call?” I am very confused by the prefixes used with yime- in the “Useful phrases” for Week 4. It feels counter-intuitive.

        • Cathy Bow
          Cathy Bow says:

          From Murray (sorry can’t show red or italics – hope you can figure it out, will email you as well)

          Great answers, shows a good grasp of the basic sentence structures so far. Here are my responses
          4. What are they doing? Njale kabirriyime?
          – In Kunbarlanja Kunwinjku, the word ‘do’ is often ‘kurduyime’ so you can also say ‘Njale kabirrikurduyime?’ or ‘Baleh kabirrikurduyime?’ where ‘baleh’ can also mean ‘what’ (in addition to ‘where’).
          5. Do you see a crocodile? Yikarrme yinan kinga? > should be— Yinan kinga.
          -karrme means to hold, so the question doesn’t make grammatical sense.
          6. Where are we going? Karrire yiddok? > Baleh karrire?
          – Karrire yiddok? means ‘Are we going?’
          How would you answer these questions?
          1. Baleh yihyo? Ngahni kore Wollongong. > Use the same verb as in the question, not a different one > Ngayo kore Woollongong. With the glottal stop ‘h’ it would tend to mean ‘sleeping [right now]’.
          2. Baleh kahyo? Ngaleng kahyo kore Darwin. > Kahyo kore Darwin.
          – You don’t need the ‘ngaleng’ it’s optional and would be there for focus or emphasis on a particular person (as opposed to another).
          3. Baleh kabirrihyo? Bedda kabirrihyo kore Melbourne.
          – Same again, you don’t need the ‘bedda’ > Kabirrihyo kore Melbourne.
          4. Njale kabirriyime? Bedda kabirrire kulabbarl.
          – Correct, but again the ‘bedda’ is optional to show emphasis or focus.
          5. Yikarrme yinan kinga? Larrk, minj nganan kinga.
          – Correct answer, very good but the question is ungrammatical/weird.
          – This question doesn’t make sense: Yikarrme yinan kinga? which would mean: Are you holding it do you see the crocodile? Yikarrme is wrong here. It means ‘Are you holding it?’
          6. Karrire yiddok? Kabirrire kunred.
          – Are we going? They are going home.
          – I think the correct answer would be ‘Yoh, karrire.’ (Yes, we are going.)
          OK, I would like to correct myself with a few things!
          5. Do you see a crocodile? Yiddok yinan kinga?
          – yes good
          2. Baleh kahyo? Ngaleng kahni kore Darwin.
          – You have changed the verb. You should repeat the same verb in your answer which should be: Kahyo kore Darwin.
          3. Baleh kabirrihyo? Bedda kabirrihni kore Melbourne.
          – correct (but bedda, again, is optional)
          6. Karrire yiddok? Karrire kunred.
          – No, the question is asking “Are we going?” (literally it means “Is it the case that we are going?”) so the answer should be “Yes, we are going.” Yiddok means ‘is it true that…’

          I would like to know more about the yime- verb. Can I use it as above where I asked “What are you doing?” and also “how do you call?” I am very confused by the prefixes used with yime- in the “Useful phrases” for Week 4. It feels counter-intuitive.

          -yime means to say or to do, but more specifically the word kurduyime is used in Kunwinjku (not in Kuninjku so much and not in Kune) to mean ‘do’.
          marneyime is made up of the benefactive prefix -marne (doing something for someone else) plus -yime and means ‘to say something to someone’ or ‘to call someone a particular kin term’.

  4. Kellie-D
    Kellie-D says:

    I absolutely LOVE! green ants. My colleague just made a green ant cheesecake – a normal cheesecake and put jelly on top that had whole green ants within it – sooo delish! I also went fishing with some ladies and one of them plucked a file snake out in a split second, it was phenomenal to watch. They put it on the coals and we ate it up – not my favourite meal. It’s turtle hunting season here in Gunabalanya. I was lucky enough to try some that a patient brought in for me. Such an interesting texture. Of course – barramundi is my favourite. And rosella at the end of the wet is the most incredible flower that boils down into the best jam and cordial – so rich in vitamin C. Also delicious when you pluck it straight off a tree.

  5. Emily-B
    Emily-B says:

    I have tried many types of bush tucker, many that grow and live in western Australia. But I have tasted rosella that grows in and around Gunbalanya.
    This weeks kinship was quite an extension, I made lots of notes and I think I will find this part difficult as in my culture we don’t have as many names for our extended family. But hopefully with more practise I will get there.

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